Posts tagged “batangas

Weekend Inspiration 36

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Thank you everyone for the follows, likes, visits and views during our Church Week. I hope you enjoyed the images and the articles. Join me next week when we embark on another picture series. Wishing you all a restful and refreshing weekend!

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Interesting interiors

For me, the interiors of churches are as much of a photographic delight as its exteriors. The grandeur in the outside is complemented or even topped off by the elaborate inside. You’ll find ornate pieces, sophisticated ceilings, fancy wrought-iron designs, luxurious stained-glass windows, and hundreds of other items of interest. It’s literally a photographer’s heaven.

JJWP662Church of Santo Tomas de Villanueva, Miag-ao town, Iloilo province

JJWP659Holy Trinity Church, Batangas City

JJWP661Cebu Cathedral, Cebu City

JJWP660Church of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, Lipa City


Church week

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This excerpt was taken from my post last Oct. 14, 2012 titled Solemn Sanctuaries:

I always have this fascination for church structures, the older and bigger, the more interesting. They are such imposing landmarks with their towering belfries, ornate decors and massive interiors, fulfilling their roles as venerable venues for the faithful, and solemn sanctuaries for the Lord’s flock. The Philippines is a showcase of ancient churches, cathedrals and basilicas. As the only predominantly Catholic country in Asia, churches big and small, old and new abound all over the Philippines.

Yes folks, we revisit the churches, cathedrals and basilicas in my image collection, and how it is to capture the grandeur and details of these architectural landmarks. Welcome to another of JJ’s picture series. Have a splendid week ahead my friends!

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Understanding the DM

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Article Excerpt:
What he was talking about was only one type of shooting: call it journalism, documentary photography, spot news photography, interpretative or environmental portraiture – even snapshooting.

Cartier-Bresson was talking about photography of the evanescent, of the here and now. The kind of photography that, in many ways, defines the entire craft, the entire art.

Most photography, but especially this kind, has a tenuous reputation for truth-telling largely because of the camera’s, if not always the photographer’s, ability to record events objectively. In fact photography is unique among the visual arts, not only because a photograph cannot be created from (sometimes clouded or prejudiced) memory, but because the subject of the photograph – and not really the photographer – determines absolutely what that depiction will be.

That is to say, Richard Avedon may trip the shutter when he makes a portrait, but the subject’s face and surroundings are what actually burn the image onto the film. Of course, Avedon brings hugely important elements into the equation as well: his talent for composition, for lighting, and of course, his sense of when his subject’s expression becomes, for Avedon, “the picture.”
~Fra nk Van Riper from his article Creating The Decisive Moment


Expressions

This to me is the joy of informal people photography – being able to capture pure, spontaneous, unrehearsed, off-the-cuff moments of genuine expressions, such as in this series of images taken at a local water festival.

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First code: observe

In more than 500 posts, I have mentioned one time or another that photographers are voyeurs, predators, opportunists, hunters, watchers and observers. Some of these descriptions may not be that flattering. But you have to admit that when you go on location and events, such as festivals, your photographer instinct kicks in and, whether you are aware of it or not, you follow the first code of photographers – observe. For what? For the interesting, appealing, amusing or unusual. You look out for colors, situations, actions and what people are doing.

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The above photo was of a festival participant. The event celebrates nationalism and people were garbed in native local costumes that came in many variations. I eyed this guy in indigenous woven hat with scarf and long-sleeved shirt. In other words, he was in a very traditional attire reminiscent of what people wore in my country during the late 1800s and early 1900s. With this information, now you know why I just had to take a picture of the guy. Its the contrast in the image, he with a modern gadget while clad in literally age-old fashion. There are lots of delightful subjects and situations during people-filled events. You just have to watch eagle-eyed and observe.


On the hunt

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Article Excerpt:
Always have your camera with you and always keep your eyes open. Serendipity plays an enormously important role in travel photography. You never know what you are going to run into, and you have to be ready. Many times you will see what could be a good photograph but decide that the light is not right, or there are no people around, or too many—something that means you will have to come back later. But sometimes you get lucky. You happen to stumble upon a scene at just the right moment. If you forgot your camera, are out of film, or your digital card is full, if you have to fumble around getting the right lens on, the moment may be gone before you can recover. This is true whether you are doing street photography or visiting a natural or man-made site. Mountains, trees, monuments, and other static subjects are, of course, not going to go anywhere, but the ray of sunshine, the soaring eagle, or the embracing couple that add the needed element to your photograph are unlikely to hang around. Think of it as hunting—whenever you leave the confines of your camp, you should be ready and able to capture whatever pops up.
~Robert Caputo from his article Travel Photography Tips