Posts tagged “people

The Sangyaw Festival of Tacloban City

Today, June 30, is the fiesta celebration of my home city of Tacloban in the central Philippines. It is highlighted by the Sangyaw (local word for dance) Festival. It is a dazzling street parade showcase of pomp and pageantry, of costumes and choreography. This was taken in 2011, the last time I was in Tacloban. If you follow world news, Tacloban City may sound familiar to you. In early November 2013, it was ground zero and in the direct path of Typhoon Haiyan, a category 5 super typhoon, the strongest cyclone to hit land packing sustained winds of 315 kph. It left more than 6,000 dead and over 1,000 missing, most of them in Tacloban. Today, after a year and a half, I have heard the city has recovered from the devastation. And I hope the celebration this day will continue the tradition of people carrying those festive smiles, graceful poses and a resilient spirit. God bless them!

Advertisements

Weekend Inspiration 41

JJWP777

A Blessed Sunday! Keep on clicking my friends!


A new chapter in this life journey

Starting tomorrow August 19, 2013, I become part of a U.S.-based advertising agency. The company president invited me to join her team of creative professionals to do work on a full-time basis. The job includes writing online content and designing blogs and websites – things that are right down my alley. I’ll be a remote staff, doing work from home. This post is not about saying goodbye to blogging. Previously I was doing online freelance work so I had more time in my hands, enabling me to do multiple posts a day early on when I started this blog October last year. By tomorrow I may not be able to follow my habit (yes it has become a habit) of daily posting. This blog will continue but not on its frenetic pace, it will slow down a bit. I still have many pictures to share together with experiences, stories and learnings. I thank all of you my blogging peers for making this online activity for the past 10 months very worthwhile, enjoyable and meaningful. But, probably like every one of you, blogging is just one chapter of my life. There are others, and for me a new one starts tomorrow which requires my undivided time and skill. I will have to focus on that. For the meantime this is JJ saying “Take care my friends and keep on clicking!”

JJBW222


Visual awareness

JJWP774

Article Excerpt:

Principles of Visual Dynamics
If you like rules, remember exceptions prove the rules. Being too insistent on the application of hard and fast rules can blind you to many exceptional opportunities. If you don’t like rules, remember that while there are no absolutes there are forces at work that have consistent tendencies. Denying or ignoring universal principles will lead to unpredictable unrepeatable results; you’ll achieve success far less frequently and be far less able to repeat your successes.

Forget rules. Forget absolutes. Forget musts. Instead develop an awareness of visual principles. Look for the unique power each element has to influence a composition. Develop a sensitivity to how elements and combination of elements make the forces at work in a composition stronger or weaker. Instead of composing formulaically, you’ll then be able to improvise. Understanding the principles of visual dynamics will help make your decision making process more informed, it will not make choices for you. Awareness is the key. Better awareness brings better choices bringing better results.
~John Paul Caponigro from his article Photographic Composition: Introduction


Island dwellers

These are actual island dwellers I’ve encountered during my travels to far-flung provinces. They are fishermen, children, kids – people who live simple lives and enjoy their natural surroundings. They don’t have elegant homes, fashionable clothes, regular work or a lifestyle to speak of. I don’t even think they have cellphones. In the first place there are no signals in these remote places. What do they have? An affinity with nature that we, dwellers of the metropolitan jungle, so obviously lack. And the barest of their needs to live a life are aptly provided for by nature’s resources, right at their doorstep. God bless these island dwellers, these people of the sea.

JJWP425

JJWP525

JJWP504

JJWP426

JJWP269

JJWP422


Cuts through the clutter

JJBW200

These photos were taken earlier in the week during a local festival. People were in colorful, native attire. But that’s just it, I get color fatigue after featuring full vibrant pictures the whole week. If you’re new to this blog, I reserve weekends for monochrome, a respite from the magnificence of color and a return to the striking simplicity of black and white. Since these are festival images, expectedly they are filled with people and details rendering them almost a dissonance of forms, a disarray of shapes. Yet in black and white, one still finds order – a harmony of mood, expressions, movement and drama. No wonder black and white is the preferred medium for portraits, photojournalism, street and people photography. It cuts through the clutter and presents purity even with subjects in seeming disorder. It was father of Canadian photojournalism Ted Grant who said:

When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in black and white, you photograph their souls!

All the best to everyone! Keep on clicking!

JJBW201


The expressive tool of B&W

JJBW196

Article Excerpt:
When we look at photographs or any images do we really need the colour aspect of the information to “see” the message the image is trying to convey? The monochrome image has been around for well over 100 years and even considering the advancements in image making and print production there remains a desire for people to see monochrome images to this day. It could be said that when we look at a monochrome image the very fact that the colour information is missing seems not to have a detrimental effect in many images…

It would be simple to say that the only discernable difference between monochrome photographs and colour photographs is the absence of colour but I believe this to be not true at all. If we are to pursue the making of fine monochrome photographs then we must understand a world with no means of chromatic expression and accept we enter a different discipline. I have seen several “colour” photographers attempt the passage into monochrome and stumble and fall without being able to fully verbalize why. The reason is that a photographer must fully understand how a particular subject will be expressed in a range of tones with the removal of colour. If monochrome is to become an expressive tool in your armoury of image making then you must eradicate the thought process “it looks good in colour so it might look good in black and white” frame of mind. If only it was that simple!
~Paul Gallagher from his article Black & White Photography – Why Take Photographs in Black and White?